TripAdvisor Reveals Top Travel Trends for 2016 According to Annual TripBarometer Study

Trip AdvisorOn 15th December TripAdvisor today announced the results of their TripBarometer study, the world’s largest accommodation and traveller survey, highlighting key travel trends for 2016.

Conducted on behalf of TripAdvisor by independent research firm Ipsos, the TripBarometer study is the analysis of more than 44,000 survey responses from travellers and the hotel sector worldwide. The TripBarometer “2016 Travel Trends” report presents a snapshot of the travel landscape for 2016, revealing US domestic and global travel trends.

“This year’s TripBarometer shows that U.S. travellers continue to recognize the importance of treating themselves to travel,” said Barbara Messing, chief marketing officer, TripAdvisor. “With one third of survey respondents planning to spend more this year, we expect to see even more travellers checking both domestic and international destinations off of their wish lists.”

U.S. Travel Trends of 2016

Seventy-eight percent of U.S. travellers plan to spend more or the same in 2016, which is the third largest annual travel budget among countries globally:

Top 10 Markets that Intend to Spend the Most in 2016

(average of all countries after conversion into USD)

1 Australia $ 10,900
2 Switzerland $ 10,100
3 United States $ 8,400
4 United Kingdom $ 8,300
5 New Zealand $ 8,000
6 Canada $ 6,500
7 Austria $ 6,400
8 Germany $ 6,300
9 France $ 6,000
10 Argentina $ 5,900

Top Reasons U.S. Travellers Will Spend More on Travel in 2016

  • Because they/their family deserves it (46%)
  • Going somewhere on their wish list (46%)
  • Going on more long trips (38%)
  • Longer length of trips (34%)

U.S. Baby Boomers plan to spend $10,600 on travel in 2016, twice as much as Millennials ($5,300). This is higher than the global averages – $8,700 and $2,900, respectively.

Ninety-six percent of U.S. travellers are planning a domestic trip in 2016 compared to the global average of 90 percent. Seventy-two percent are planning an international trip, which is slightly lower than the global average of 85 percent.Top Reasons U.S.

Respondents Choose Travel Destinations

  • Culture of the destination (50%)
  • Recommendations from family and friends (36%)
  • Events (34%)
  • Special offers/packages at hotel or accommodation (27%)

When selecting accommodations, cost is the key consideration for travellers in the U.S. – 94 percent of respondents named price as the most important factor when booking the accommodation for their last trip. Accommodation ratings (90%), TripAdvisor reviews (89%), proximity to attractions (86%) and dining options (79%) also ranked high on the list.

Germans, on the other hand, are more likely to find travel inspiration from their favourite documentary with 26 per cent revealing they have chosen to visit a destination simply after seeing it on screen.

Americans and New Zealanders are far more practical, however, choosing their final getaway locations in accordance with events they have to attend.

U.S. Traveller Quirks

The Top 5 Things U.S. Travellers Won’t Leave Home Without

  • Toiletries (77%)
  • Smartphone (74%)
  • Camera (57%)
  • Clothing for special occasions (56%)
  • Adaptor (51%)

U.S. travellers rank as the fourth most “germophobic” in the world, with 37 percent listing hand sanitizer as a travel essential, compared to 23 percent globally. They value their beauty rest as well – 13 percent bring their own pillow, higher than the global average of six percent.  37 per cent of British survey participants named their must-have travel essential as an e-book.

Meanwhile, Indonesian, Argentinian, Malaysian, Chinese and Mexican travellers are the top five nationalities most likely to pack an extra suitcase when they take a trip – likely, to ensure they have plenty of space to transport their shopping haul.

And though Indonesians may be most likely to be spotted sporting wearable technology, 12 per cent of Chinese travellers revealed they were also careful not to leave home without it.

But only two per cent of Italians would be caught trying out the tech trend.

Amenity Deal Breakers

Certain amenities will make or break a hotel’s chances of earning a booking. U.S. travellers expect more for less, and will book elsewhere if an accommodation does not offer:

  • Air-conditioning (70%)
  • In-room Wi-Fi (42%)
  • Parking (38%)
  • Safe deposit (25%)
  • Breakfast (24%)

A third of all Thai, Indonesian and Indian travellers say that they are planning to try an adventure holiday for the first time in 2016, while one in six Indian millennials refuse to book a hotel without gym facilities.

And the most frequent flyers? Ten per cent of all jet-setting Swiss travellers polled revealed that they were planning on taking more than 10 international trips in the next year, making them the most likely nationality to accrue some major frequent flyer points.

But don’t expect them to be using those miles to visit family members abroad.

New Zealanders are the most likely to fly across an ocean to visit family, with 30 per cent saying they’d choose a destination to spend time with their next of kin.

In contrast, Russian, Austrians and Thai are the least likely to do so. Only four per cent said they’d select a destination for this reason.

TripAdvisor summaries the report into 6 key travel trends:

Trend #1 – Seeking new experiences

In the coming year, travelers of all ages will seek out things they haven’t tried before, from cruises to solo travel and more.

  • Globally, 69% of travelers plan to try something new in 2016.
  • 1 in 5 global travelers said they would try a cruise for the first time next year.
  • 17% will try solo travel for the first time in 2016; 15% will try adventure travel for the first time.

Trend #2 – Spending more because it’s “worth it”

Worldwide, travelers are open to spending more in 2016 than they have in the past—and not just because of rising costs.

  • 1 in 3 travelers (33%) are planning to spend more on travel in 2016 than they did the previous year.
  • Among those who plan to increase their travel budget, 49% said they will do so because “because I or my family deserve it.”
  • 31% said they would spend more on travel because “it’s important for my health and well-being.”

Trend #3 – Choosing destinations based on culture, special offers

Today’s travelers choose destinations for a number of reasons, including special offers from accommodations.

  • Globally, 47% of travelers say they have visited a destination because of the culture and people of the specific country.
  • 1 in 5 travelers (21%) have chosen a destination because a hotel had a special offer or package.
  • “TV tourism” is on the rise: 1 in 5 global travelers have visited a destination because they saw it on a TV show.

Trend #4 – Staying cool and connected

Among the amenities that travelers will look for when they book an accommodation in 2016, air conditioning and WiFi stand out.

  • Globally, 63% of travelers said air conditioning is a must-have when choosing a place to stay. That makes it more of a deal-breaker than breakfast (40%) or a swimming pool (26%).
  • 46% said free in-room WiFi is a must-have amenity—meaning that, if an accommodation did not provide it, they would look elsewhere.
  • 26% of travelers said that they require an accommodation that has super-fast WiFi; 11% are willing to pay extra for this service.

Trend #5 – Rising room rates (and optimism)

Many accommodations plan to raise their room rates next year, while the majority of hoteliers say they’re optimistic about profitability in 2016.

  • Nearly half of hoteliers globally plan to increase room rates in 2016 (47%).
  • Most accommodations are increasing rates to compensate for increased overhead costs (65%), although more than a third are increasing rates because of recently completed renovations (37%) or because of increased demand (35%).
  • 3 in 4 business owners are optimistic about profitability in 2016. The majority of those who are optimistic say it’s because of local events and conferences taking place in their markets next year (65%).
  • 91% of hoteliers see increasing direct bookings as key for the future of their business.

Trend #6 – Managing reputations online

Online presence remains important: In 2016, businesses will be keeping a close eye on what people are saying about them on the web.

  • 93% of hoteliers said that online traveler reviews are important for the future of their business.
  • Online reputation management is still the biggest area of investment for accommodation owners in 2016, with 59% investing more in this area than they did the previous year.

For additional information about the TripBarometer, please visit: tripadvisor to download the global report.

Source: TripAdvisor Reveals Top Travel Trends for 2016 According to Annual TripBarometer Study Nasdaq:TRIP

MessageGears Provides Enterprise-Wide Email Marketing Solution to Expedia | Benzinga

MessageGears’ hybrid technology provides Expedia.com with the power and security of on-premises software combined with the efficiency and scalability of cloud delivery.  Expedia plans to implement the MessageGears hybrid email marketing solution throughout many of the brands in its extensive portfolio.

With MessageGears’ hybrid email marketing solution, Expedia does not have to replicate data and send it to the cloud. Instead, Expedia is able to access the most up-to-date data from the company’s secure, internal database, while making use of the cloud to handle resource-heavy tasks, such message rendering and delivery without having to replicate, sync, or store data in the cloud. The end result is more personalized, relevant, and efficient messaging using the freshest data available from consumer touch points.

“MessageGears provides us with unique benefits, including real-time access to our customer data from a centralized database. This allows us to increase the personalization and relevancy of our communication with our customers,” said Scott Grove, Sr. Director of Technology at Expedia.com.

“In addition, MessageGears helps us achieve consistency across our email marketing platforms so we can maintain an up-to-date global view of customer engagement.”

“The volume of messages Expedia sends means the company has some of the industry’s most demanding requirements when it comes to email marketing and customer data management. The MessageGears team helped Expedia meet these challenges head-on, enhancing the company’s ability to send timely and relevant messages,” said Dan Roy, CEO of MessageGears.

Through working with enterprise clients, such as Expedia, MessageGears has experienced explosive growth. The company’s email volume has quadrupled since 2014, while still maintaining industry leading uptime.

Current MessageGears clients include ClickDimensions, MusicToday, PGi, Pursuant Health, Right On Interactive, Runkeeper, and Sabre Travel Network. MessageGears expects monthly message volume to exceed 2 billion by the end of 2016.

Source: MessageGears Provides Enterprise-Wide Email Marketing Solution to Expedia | Benzinga

Travel trade leads the way in ‘moment’ marketing

The travel industry is leading the way in the new marketing buzzword, ‘moment’ marketing, according to research.

A recent Warc and Deloitte 2016 Toolkit highlighted ‘moment’ marketing – where data and technology are used to identify brief marketing opportunities – as the number one trend for next year.

And moment marketing firm TVTY claims the travel sector is already using the most sophisticated ‘moment’ marketing strategies.

Online ‘moment’ marketing campaigns are triggered by offline events including sport, TV programmes, adverts, financial events and the weather.  TVTY says it’s about connecting with people at the key moment when they reach for their phone or laptop or use social media.

Its research found that 64% of digital marketers in the travel industry were going to allocate more budget to moment marketing in 2016.It also found 29% use both their own TV and competitor’s advertising to trigger campaigns and 43% use travel metrics (such as public transport delays) to launch ‘moment’ digital campaigns.

Antoine de Kermel, UK MD of  TVTY, said: “Travel is a highly competitive space online. There is a lot of innovation in digital marketing, and travel has been an early adopter of moment marketing. We see travel marketers using a lot of triggers to target consumers, but, as you might expect, weather is a very popular trigger.

“People are much more likely to book a getaway when the weather suddenly turns bad, or when another transport delay drives commuters to pack their bags for a carefree week in Barbados.”

An interesting trend we’re seeing, specifically from travel companies, is a desire to use new sources of data – like flight delays – as a trigger for digital campaigns. For example, a popular airline might want to launch a campaign, which highlights its own punctuality whenever its nearest competitor is facing delays.”

You can access their latest white paper here.

Source: Travel trade leads the way in ‘moment’ marketing

Three travel brands innovating in crowdsourced marketing | Econsultancy

The first act of out-reaching to the crowd is 300-years-old (dates back to 1714), but the term ‘crowdsourcing’ was first coined in 2005 by two Wired Magazine editors Jeff Howe and Mark Robinson.

The whole idea of the internet is inherently based on the idea of crowdsourcing.  The internet is the place where the opinions of thousands are collected to help others in their decision-making.  And now social platforms have made it very simple to instantly reach out to many people and pick their brains.  The web is a silo of opinions, ideas and services curated by the mob.  People also tend to be more open in web-based projects.

Crowdsourcing has proven to be one of the most disruptive business models of the modern age.

In travel, the most notable examples are TripAdvisor and Airbnb, whose business models are built on user-generated resources.  The traditional travel sector has woken up to the value of crowdsourced marketing, too.  It’s not only the popular (and cost-effective) thing to do: it’s just plain good marketing.

Why? Because marketing at its core means bonding with your customer.

These three traditional British travel brands below use crowdsourcing to bring their products to market in new and exciting ways and drive innovation:

1) British Airways

In 2011, British Airways was the first British travel brand that turned to the public to co-create its aircraft menus, movies and livery.  Budding chefs, scriptwriters and artists were called upon to submit their ideas as part of the airline’s ‘Great Britons’ programme, initially launched in 2009 in anticipation of the Olympic Games.

These ideas were then taken forward and enhanced by category experts like renowned chef Heston Blumenthal, actor Richard E Grant and artist Tracey Emin.

The final outcome: a new on-board menu, in-flight movies and artwork for the exterior of the aircraft.

British Airways and Metro crowdsourced collaboration.

Following the success of this project, British Airways went on to pioneer the first ever live integrated crowd-sourced travel campaign in partnership with Metro in 2014.  This initiative gave consumers a unique opportunity to create and edit content using social media channels.  As part of this campaign English comedian Joe Wilkinson was tasked with a series of globe-trotting challenges.

Metro readers voted online for the places they would like to see him visit and the experiences they wanted him to have on his adventure.  The campaign featured a live feed of reader comments on Metro.co.uk, plus Wilkinson directly interacted with the audience using social channels.  This campaign strengthened customers’ relationships with the British Airways brand in an innovative way.

2) TUI Thomson

TUI Thomson’s “Name Our Plane” campaign saw the brand crowdsource a name for its first 787 aircraft on Twitter in 2012.

The success of this type of campaign has led Thomson to run a similar campaign this year, which focuses on both suggestions and user votes.  The selected winner’s name will be fitted on the new Dreamliner 787 and winner will be flown to a free long-haul destination on the brand new plane.

screen_shot_2015-11-04_at_11-30-28

Thomson crowdsourced the first wedding

TUI Thomson is also the first travel brand that crowdsourced a wedding decided by Facebook fans in 2015. The “Your Big Day” campaign invited people to vote for their favourite couple, the best wedding dress (which the bride then had to wear), the best hen or stag party idea and the best venue.  All expenses for the wedding and honeymoon were paid for by Thomson. The contest received 700 entrants and 10,000 votes.

3) Visit Britain

In 2014 VisitBritain worked with Genero to crowdsource a number of short films to feature on its international Sounds of GREAT Britain campaign.

Genero represents a global network of filmmakers, who were tasked with producing a number of short films reflecting the variety of sights, sounds and experiences on offer across Britain. T

he winning films were featured on VisitBritain’s Lovewall and were distributed across all global markets, with a bespoke end result for each language and region.

The films were created to give different perspectives of the locations and themes featured in VisitBritain’s ‘Sounds of GREAT Britain’ campaign.

The resulting multimedia content was original, sharable and a good example of evergreen content.Crowdsourcing allows brands to utilise the creative power of their greatest asset – their customers – in exciting new ways. The best projects drive interest, website traffic and all round good vibes to the brand in question.

Source: Three travel brands innovating in crowdsourced marketing | Econsultancy

How booking APIs are changing the online travel game – Tnooz

This is a viewpoint from Sean Sewell, co-founder and EMEA business development director, Performance Horizon.

Digital travel sales are expected to surpass $481 billion worldwide this year according to eMarketer.

The set-up

We’ve already seen many interesting developments this year. Google moved beyond being a third-party traffic referer and entered the distribution space. This bold move, which allows consumers to book travel directly via its Hotel Finder, puts the search giant in direct competition with some of its biggest customers such as Hotels.com and Skyscanner.  Likewise, TripAdvisor has evolved beyond being just a travel content site and now allows consumers to read reviews and book all in one place.

Most consumers are unaware that they get this seamless experience thanks to something behind the scenes – application programming interfaces (APIs).

The solution

Specifically, it is booking APIs are changing where and how consumers book travel. Here’s how booking APIs are driving change and how all parties – such as travel brands, digital marketing partners,  publishers and consumers – benefit from an increased investment and integration of online and mobile booking APIs.  Also addressed are how travel brands and digital marketing partners are working to overcome booking API challenges.

Travel BrandsBooking APIs are not new – far from it – so why are travel brands waking up to the potential of using booking APIs to optimize conversions and maximize inventory distribution?  First and foremost. it is the rapidly shifting sands of how consumers browse and buy. Most travel brands will tell you the same thing: people research flights and hotels on their phones in the morning and book on desktops later in the day.

While mobile experiences are getting better, many brands have not fully developed a streamlined mobile booking process.  Mobile is where digital marketing partners – such as Google, TripAdvisor, metasearch and OTAs –  and booking APIs are a perfect match. These partners understand mobile, not necessarily a core competency of a travel brand whose primary focus is putting planes in the air and providing great accommodations for guests.  By making their booking APIs available to a  range of online and mobile partners, travel brands can increase market distribution and booking conversions beyond traditional partners, while stemming drop off rates by providing the most seamless customer experiences.

Digital Marketing Partners

The benefits of booking APIs work both ways. Publishers other than metas, are leveraging booking APIs to both provide their readers with better experiences and boost their own profitability as a digital marketing partner.

Today’s consumers move on quickly if they can’t easily find information or a complete a transaction. For publishers large and small, eyeballs and time on site are like physical currency. In order to reduce bounce rate, publishers must provide experiences that enable readers to complete actions from start to finish all without leaving their site.

Reader’s Digest opened up travel booking directly from its online properties. This makes sense, as publishers know their readers best. By working with travel brands who have vast amounts of data (past bookings, frequent fliers, first class vs. economy), publishers can drive conversions and increase their revenues by providing readers with the most relevant offers.

It’s not all straightforward however.  Publishers have many challenges when using booking APIs, especially around credit card transactions, security, and data ownership. Many times, brands will control everything in order to secure customer data.

Overcoming challenges

In addition to the security issue, booking APIs can come with challenges around formatting and the investment to do so.  This is one pain-point IATA’s New Distribution Capability (NDC) hopes to address.  As booking APIs evolve and become easier to implement and use, more and more partners will work directly with brands, increasing distribution and potentially reducing the need for more traditional tracking methods via affiliate networks and pure tracking providers.  And the technology is there for brands and their digital marketing partner to connect directly and share/track data in real-time.

To summarize, I think the trend toward booking APIs that’s taken hold this year will set the stage for an exciting era in the travel vertical. Competition will increase as the lines continue to blur between meta-search engines and OTAs, and as Google aggressively expands its direct booking clients.In general, the smartest brands and digital marketing partners will leverage booking APIs to unlock continued growth and profitability.

Source: How booking APIs are changing the online travel game – Tnooz

Brand Karma & TrustYou Partner to Bring Hotel & Tourism Brands the Best of Reputation Management & Virtual Reality –

Brand Karma and TrustYou have announced a strategic partnership, bringing together TrustYou’s powerful reputation management tools and Brand Karma’s digital innovation in virtual reality (VR).

The needs of the travel enterprise continue to evolve. Hotels now need to unify a complex mix of traveller feedback from reviews, social media, and guest survey data to delight the guest and stay competitive.  At the same time, new media platforms are rapidly changing travel distribution, with virtual reality revolutionizing hotel sales and marketing.

Source: Brand Karma & TrustYou Partner to Bring Hotel & Tourism Brands the Best of Reputation Management & Virtual Reality –

The Hotel and Resort Operator’s Digital Marketing Budget Guide for 2016

Cover from The Hotel and Resort Operator's Digital Marketing Budget Guide for 2016 eBook

The Hotel and Resort Operator’s Digital Marketing Budget Guide for 2016

Vizergy Vizergy – Digital Travel Marketing, the hospitality industry’s leading provider of website design and digital marketing programs, releases its eBook on how hoteliers can plan and budget to achieve the highest return on investment for the upcoming year. Budgeting for digital marketing can be overwhelming due to the rapidly changing opportunities and numerous tools available. This ebook helps hoteliers stay on track by providing thoughtful recommendations from top media analysts along with a free budgeting Excel template.

More than half of all hotel rooms will be booked online by the end of 2015 (Google Research). Therefore, establishing a strategic digital marketing plan to capitalize on this trend is vital to the success of any hotel property. Vizergy’s complimentary eBook explains how hoteliers can align their digital marketing budgets with business goals and gives useful tips on deciding how much of your marketing budget to devote to digital. In addition to useful budget recommendations, the eBook includes a hotel digital marketing budget template created by our experts with more than 15 years of hospitality experience.

Click here to get a complimentary copy of “The Hotelier’s Guide to 2016 Digital Marketing Spend” today.

Source: The Hotel and Resort Operator’s Digital Marketing Budget Guide for 2016

Contextual Marketing – How it works in the Travel Industry – Big Data for Travel – Boxever

Everybody is talking about contextual marketing, but really, what is it and how will it benefit our travel customers’ experience?

In the madmen days of advertising, you would reach a customer through billboards or television ads placed at very strategic locations or times. Outdoor billboards near snow-laden airports featuring warm, sunny climate destinations. Television ads for airlines running on the evening news, touting easy flights for business executives. When was the last time you saw one of those?

The marketing industry has come a long way and digital marketing has completely changed how we reach our target audience. Contextual Marketing means discovering the context in which specific audiences were to be found. It is about the digital fingerprint, looking at what a customer has done, what they are currently doing, and predicting what they may do in the future based on their habits and trends. In the past that meant taking advantage of situations like freezing cold northerners who drive by boards near airports as they head to and from work or business executives who travel that watch the stock market reports during the evening news.

The fundamental concept of contextual marketing reaching audiences when they are in a specific time and place or frame of mind for considering your product or service — is still very valid. The difference is that the information we now have to support contextual marketing is more personalized and enriched with more details.

Equally important, the channels for reaching travellers are now highly individualized and personalized thanks to the ubiquitous tiny screens that are ever present in our lives. Instead of reaching that winter sun-seeker on his or her way to the airport, you can beam them an email directly to their laptop or tablet. The timing has become fine-tuned as well. For example, you know they’re in a look-to-book frame of mind if you send a remarketing email within six hours of a fare or destination search on your website.

There are many data drivers for today’s successful contextual marketing.

When blended, these drivers create hyper-personalized offers and content timed to reach highly receptive audiences at exactly the right moment. These drivers can include:

Location

Device

Historic behaviour

Real-time information

For example, let’s take Margie Foley. An online travel agency has her in its database as a female, aged 36, who lives outside of Hartford, Connecticut. In the past she has travelled to Fort Lauderdale in early March, midweek, leaving at 7am, returning the following Monday at 4pm. Now add her device information – her email and cell phone number. Then, (here’s where it gets really fun) pull in some third party weather data.

The OTA uses a sophisticated travel marketing platform that includes a recommendation engine that creates contextual marketing offers on the fly. So, on a snowy morning in January, Margie is headed out the door on her way to work. The recommendation engine pulls together an offer for a great deal to Fort Lauderdale, including a discount for an extra night’s stay at her favourite hotel. Timed to reach her during her lunch hour – while the morning’s nightmare commute is still on her mind and the snow continues to pile up outside her office window — the offer entices her into a temporary reverie with a picture of a Fort Lauderdale beach at sunset. The discount encourages her to book now so she’ll have two months of looking forward to her vacation – surely a powerful tactic to get her through the New England winter.

Now, multiply Margie’s offer by the 2,000 other New Englanders in the OTA’s database that share a similar travel history and who are also staring at the falling snow. Divide by the fractional cost of beaming them an email and the efficiency of contextual marketing (cost divided by booking rate equals ROI) becomes very clear indeed.

But perhaps the most compelling thought is that contextual marketing is in its infancy.

As travel marketers become more sophisticated and begin applying what I call personal interest data, the recommendation engines will be able to layer in additional personalization that will really drive contextual marketing to a whole new level and really make it so that every connection is 1:1.

Margie, it turns out, is a rabid Red Sox fan and her name is in the team’s ticketing database. Imagine the team clinches the American League pennant. The next day, while visions of victory dance in her head, she receives a contextual marketing offer that includes a World Series package pulled together on the fly. Go Sox. Go Margie.

This 1:1 marketing is what our customers are coming to expect. There is a move away from generic advertising, which can be seen in the latest iOS release that has the ability to block ads. We now need to start looking at ways to interact and provide extremely relevant information and offers to our customers.

Source: Contextual Marketing – How it works in the Travel Industry – Big Data for Travel – Boxever

Sabre AirVision Market Intelligence solution expands distribution with Airport Strategy and Marketing… — SOUTHLAKE, Texas, Aug. 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ —

SOUTHLAKE, Texas, Aug. 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ — Sabre Corporation (NASDAQ: SABR), a global technology provider to the travel industry, has signed an agreement with Airport Strategy and Marketing (ASM), a leading consultancy firm with expertise in defining route development for airports worldwide.

sabre-logo-250x61Under this agreement, ASM will extend their current product portfolio by offering Sabre AirVision Market Intelligence to better serve their global customer community of airports and key stakeholder partners.

Sabre AirVision Market Intelligence addresses a key aspect of the airline business by connecting parties to robust market data. Ultimately, this solution provides advanced data analysis capabilities for business development and commercial planning departments. Airlines, airports, tourism boards and other travel related companies use Sabre AirVision Market Intelligence to drive efficiency around commercial planning, identify new revenue opportunities, and increase competitive insight.

“I am delighted we have reached this new agreement with Sabre, and as major users of Market Intelligence we find it to be the strongest demand and schedule data system on the market,” said David Stroud, managing director for ASM. “I am pleased we can now effectively add the product into our portfolio of services and enhance our offer to the world’s airports.”

“This new deal is a win-win scenario for both organizations. ASM deepens their customer offerings, while Sabre expands into the airport market and extends the reach of Market Intelligence to additional customers,” said Darren Rickey, vice president of Sabre AirVision.

First-class route development is dependent upon quality traffic data. With the data Sabre AirVision Market Intelligence provides, ASM will continue to provide consulting, analytics and training services to its airport customers. This new agreement reinforces the long standing relationship between the two companies. In addition to Airline Solutions’ status as ASM’s preferred airport data supplier, ASM now has the rights to market and sell this data solution.

Source: Sabre AirVision Market Intelligence solution expands distribution with Airport Strategy and Marketing… — SOUTHLAKE, Texas, Aug. 26, 2015 /PRNewswire/ —

Back to basics – ten tips for travel search marketing [INFOGRAPHIC]

Back to basics – ten tips for travel search marketing [INFOGRAPHIC].

Hanapin Marketing, a UK-based agency which works with a number of travel and tourism brands, has produced a rather handy, back-to-basics guide to search marketing in the travel industry.

(click image or here for a larger version)

hanapin infographic 550px