Digital Marketing Trends Redefining Tourism Prospects | Travelandtourworld.comTravelandtourworld.com

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

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Technological advancement has completely revolutionized the concept of travelling round the globe. With the increasing number of travel technology providers, tourism in different exotic destinations gets a boost. Hassle-free and instant in its function, travel apps are the latest trend among global tourists.

Digital marketing is the most sought-after modish trend to promote tourism. Offering promotional deals is a simple way to invite potential customers to travel while segmenting your market to find interests for touring.

Social media marketing has immensely contributed to increase tourist influx in unconventional destinations along with boosting tourism in picturesque locales.Among the 25 major international markets surveyed, Asia ranks top in online travel bookings, mobile searches and mobile bookings.

Asian travellers lead the field when it comes to mobile travel bookings and searches performed, at 33% and 59% respectively, compared to the global average of 25% and 46% respectively.Travellers continue to use the internet for both information and booking.

Travel advertisers need to take full take advantage of the opportunities online advertising offer, as the key component in their marketing strategy.If you are a travel advertiser, then Adform has a range of new and exciting Rich Media formats that will perfectly fit your campaign objectives.

For instance, what should you do when you want to entice travellers to visit a specific island? How can you recreate that beach sensation for them? Check out their Sandstorm format and the revolutionizing Snowball format for a brighter tourism prospect.

via Digital Marketing Trends Redefining Tourism Prospects | Travelandtourworld.comTravelandtourworld.com.

Travel Marketing the Social Media Way

Travel Marketing the Social Media Way

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By Ilya Albert, Published June 27, 2014

You would have looked for their advices on going to places they suggest and booking the accommodation there that they would tell you to be the best for you. The advent of the social media seems to have changed this concept completely.

Making Travel Plans from Social Media

As many as 40% of the travelers use social media for travel inspiration and 42% use it for planning their trip, says Trip Advisor. But what seems to be an important information provided by this travel website is that an overwhelming 76% seems to use social media platforms for sharing their travel experiences, Almost 91% of the travelers who take social media into account post photos there. Besides, many others also use social media platforms to post videos or write ups to share their online friends. Therefore, these experiences are surely going to impress others and influence their decisions in future while going for a trip.

Finding the Best Accommodation on Social Media

Worried how to find the perfect place to stay during your trip? Social media can help you in this process as well. Hundreds of hotels and timeshare companies are advertising on Facebook and other social media platforms. This provides you with the option of finding the best options for staying, which can make your trip an enchanting one. While you can go for luxury hotels, there are also budget options, such as timeshares and bed & breakfast inns, which can help you complete the trip within a short time. Check out different social media platforms for advice from the people who have already treaded the route you are planning to travel.

Social Media as a Travel Best Practice

According to LinkedIn, the integration of social media in the travel industry for marketing has been one of the best practices. More and more travel and tourism companies are engaging these days in the process of social media marketing. In fact, different governments are also engaging in advertising the places in their territories as the perfect travel destinations. Besides, these governments and also a few travel companies are providing different types of offers to the travelers. This is driving more and more people with every passing day to use these social media platforms for making their travel plans.Social Media becoming Important Travel Marketing PlatformTravel companies have already started taking the social media platforms seriously. They are planning special marketing programs on these websites. Many of them are creating pages of their own on social media sites, such as Facebook. They are using these pages to provide information about their offerings. Besides, they are also providing images and videos of these places to make the tourists more interested in them. Hence, many of these companies are finding that a large number of their customers are being mobilized from the social media platforms.

Marketing in the Social Media Groups on Travel

Have you already joined a social media website for making travel plans? Are you worried how to start with the process? You will find quite a few groups, which are engaged in discussions about travel. Join them. You can even ask questions to clarify your doubts or finding the best destinations. This is why many travel marketing companies also join these travel groups on social media. They find these a perfect place to market their plans. When you ask a question, they can answer it and, at the same time, publicize their offerings as well. This is likely to help them increase their business revenues significantly.Like any other process, travel marketing was also growing and transforming over the years. As social media became an integral part of the life, it entered almost all the industries. The travel industry was no exception as well. Social media has been utilized significantly. Hence, it has helped to take the process of travel a significant step forward.

via Travel Marketing the Social Media Way.

REPORT: Apps Are Key To Reaching Travelers – AllFacebook

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David Cohen on June 20, 2014 

The way people travel has moved far beyond the days of travel agents and calling cards thanks to rapid advances in mobile technology, and a new report from Facebook and Boston Consulting Group offers a look at how travel marketing needs to change in order to keep pace.

Key findings from “Travel Goes Mobile,” according to a post on the Facebook for Business page, were:

  • Mobile should be integral and central to your marketing strategy. People spend the majority of their time online using their mobile devices, yet most travel companies haven’t reflected this shift in their marketing and business strategies.
  • The proliferation of applications will become increasingly prevalent in a mobile-driven world. As people spend more time on their smartphones and tablets — primarily via apps — travel companies have vast opportunities to communicate with new and existing customers during every phase of the travel journey. From becoming inspired, dreaming about where to go because of an ad, a post, or a picture, to planning, booking, experiencing, reflecting, and sharing, digital and mobile technologies enhance these experiences.
  • Sophisticated apps enable travel companies to foster loyalty with new and existing customers. Apps provide direct lines of communication; they help determine intent and add brand value over the long term.

Facebook Global Head of Travel Strategy Lee McCabe, co-author of the report, wrote in the Facebook for Business post:

This paper reveals the extraordinary role mobile can and will continue to play in travel and the tremendous value it can add to travel companies’ and travelers’ experiences alike. Importantly, this paper highlights the urgent need for travel companies to develop sophisticated apps, which, when combined with rich data and sophisticated targeting capabilities, allow for personalized marketing at scale. The ability to perfectly time and tailor messages is very powerful from a business standpoint — for both brand and direct response-related objectives.

via REPORT: Apps Are Key To Reaching Travelers – AllFacebook.

Skyscanner aims to challenge Baidu in the Chinese travel market – Telegraph

Edinburgh-based company acquires local start-up Youbibi to gain foothold in domestic travel comparison

bai_1950695bBaidu is China’s Google, dominating general web search and competing in many specialist search markets Photo: REUTERS

By Christopher Williams, Technology, Media and Telecoms Editor

Skyscanner, the British flight search company, aims to challenge Baidu, the dominant Chinese web search engine, with the acquisition of Youbibi, a local domestic travel price comparison start-up

The deal will see Youbibi’s 20-strong team, based in Shenzen, come under the control of Skyscanner’s existing Chinese operation in Beijing.

Skyscanner, based in Edinburgh, said the acquisition will provide mostly expertise in product development and domestic travel. Youbibi’s search receives only 100,000 visitors per month, roughly a tenth of Skyscanner’s Chinese website.

skyscanner_logoAndy Sleigh, Skyscanner’s general manager for Asia, said: “It’s primarily and engineering workforce. Our team in Beijing is primarily a sales and marketing workforce.”Skyscanner refused to disclose the financial terms of the acquisition.

Like Skyscanner, Youbibi specialises in ‘metasearch’, or searching comparison sites. It is focused on the Chinese domestic tourism market, which the central government last year said it would make a development priority over the next seven years. Chinese travellers will spend $75bn online in 2017, according to estimates by iResearch.

Steven Pang, Youbibi’s chief executive, said: “We are proud of the technology that we have developed and, by bringing this together on our platform with Skyscanner’s global flight expertise, we believe we can create a really exciting travel search tool for all Chinese travellers.”

Skyscanner established its Beijing operation in 2012 via a deal with Baidu, which controls about four fifths of the Chinese web search market. The British company provides Baidu with international flight price comparison data.

Its push into the domestic market with Youbibi will put it in direct competition with Qunar, Baidu’s own domestic travel search tool.

via Skyscanner aims to challenge Baidu in the Chinese travel market – Telegraph.

Survey Says: Millennials Now Drive Leisure Travel in U.S. | TravelPulse

JAMES SHILLINGLAW | JUNE 24, 2014

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For the past 10 years, the travel industry was focused on Baby Boomers, who were considered the most lucrative market. As Boomers got older, it was assumed, they would have more time and more money to travel.

That certainly has been the case over the last decade, and boomers continue to be a major market for travel. But now the industry may want to refocus on the often forgotten Millennial or Gen Y traveler, at least according to the 2014 Portrait of American Travelers, an annual survey by MMGY Global, a travel marketing services firm.

According to the survey, Millennials those between the ages of 18 and 35 will be the driving force behind the continued recovery of the U.S. travel industry. They are also expected to spend incrementally more on travel services than any other age group over the next 12 months.

The survey found that 24 percent of Millennial travelers are planning to take more overnight leisure trips in the next 12 months, versus 14 percent who are planning fewer trips, a net difference of 10 percent. This compares with a negative net difference of 1 percent for Boomers, and negative net differences of 3 percent and 6 percent for Matures and Xers, respectively.

Gen Yers also plan to spend significantly more on leisure travel services in the next 12 months, well ahead than any of the other generational cohorts: an average of $887 on a previous-year base of $4,499. Gen Xers intend to spend the second highest increment: $666 on a previous-year base of $4,341.

According the MMGY Global, both trends are consistent with the manner in which Millennials view the sanctity of their vacation time. Last year they took an average of 4.6 overnight trips for leisure purposes versus an average of 4.2 trips for all U.S. households with an annual income over $50,000.

“Six in 10 Millennials would rather spend their money on experiences than material things,” said Steve Cohen, vice president of insights for MMGY Global. “This is presumably one of the reasons we’ve observed the spike in their intentions with respect to leisure travel in the year ahead…Millennials’ planning, booking and sharing habits are significantly different from those of older leisure travelers.”

All this could be good for travel agents. In an earlier survey for the American Society of Travel Agents on the value of using a travel agent, MMGY Global found nearly 60 percent of Millennials who used travel agents believed that their vacations were better than those organized without their assistance. The study also found that consumers that use an agent travel more average 4.7 trips than consumers that don’t use a travel agent average 3.6 trips.

On the other hand, Millennials’ travel interests don’t always extend to more distant destinations. Gen Yers are more likely to have taken a “staycation” during the last 12 months than all other travelers. Thirty-three percent took at least one vacation within 50 miles of their home, versus 27 percent among all other leisure travelers. One third said their choice was made to save money to take a more substantial vacation during the year ahead.

The MMGY Portrait of American Travelers, now in its 24th year, reflects the lifestyles and travel behavior of approximately 57 million American households who spent an average of $4,429 on leisure travel in the last year. Collectively, they represent nearly $240 billion in U.S. travel spending. The survey polls 2,550 active leisure travelers who reside in households with an annual income of $50,000 or more and who have taken at least one leisure trip of 75 miles or more from home during the previous 12 months on which they used overnight accommodations.

via Survey Says: Millennials Now Drive Leisure Travel in U.S. | TravelPulse.

Big data fuels rise of real-time travel marketing – TTG Asia – Leader in Hotel, Airlines, Tourism and Travel Trade News

Xinyi Liang-Pholsena, Bangkok, June 20, 2014 

pata logoTHE growing availability of large public and private information sources has led to the development of big data analytics, a potential trove of information that travel businesses can leverage to deliver more effective and tailored services to their customers.

In particular, Asia’s high rates of smartphone penetration, skyrocketing demand for ‘phablets’ mobile devices straddling smartphone and tablet and immense popularity of social media underscore the vast opportunities big data present, said speakers at PATAcademy-HCD, which takes place in Bangkok from June 17 to 20.

“The Internet of things” – a term that refers to the advanced connectivity of devices, systems and services – can enable travel brands to capitalise on the potential of “real-time marketing” to personalise the customer experience and predict their current and future needs, said Sonal Patel, business development director, exchange – APAC, Twitter Singapore.

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Moreover, the emergence of wearable technology like Google Glass will further enhance the development of real-time marketing.

 

Citing his market research firm’s findings, Laurens van den Oever, global director for travel at GfK, illustrated how big data can be used to understand the booking seasonality and characteristics of destinations around the world.

For example, German and English travellers are early bookers while Italians and Russians tend to be late bookers when it comes to a summer vacation in Spain; within the region, Singaporeans are extremely late bookers, usually just four weeks in advance, he shared.

Applying booking seasonality trends to crisis communication, PATA COO, Mario Hardy, remarked: “If a crisis in a destination happens during high season, how you communicate to your markets is also different from when it happens during low season.”

While online is a part of nearly all travellers’ consumer journeys, van den Oever also pointed out that offline remains a major influencer. “Cross-channel usage is strong, so travel marketers should ensure a synergy of message across online and offline touch points,” he said. “For package tours, travel agencies and catalogues are still important touch points.”

Moreover, he also emphasised the complexity of travel purchase journeys, as consumers go through multiple pathways – ranging from generic search and aggregators to destinations and travel agencies – prior to making a booking so it is vital for travel marketers to consider the placement of their message. “Being present on all touch points is becoming mission critical,” he stressed.

via Big data fuels rise of real-time travel marketing – TTG Asia – Leader in Hotel, Airlines, Tourism and Travel Trade News.

Asian travellers lead in mobile travel search and bookings [INFOGRAPHIC]

Jun 12.2014 

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Asian travellers are leading the field when it comes to mobile travel bookings and searches performed, at 33% and 59% respectively, compared to the global average of 25% and 46% respectively.

The findings are part of a study conducted by online accommodation specialist AsiaRooms, and Lenovo, among 12,000 users 6,000 in APAC, and 6,000 in the non-APAC region in the past year.

Among the 25 major international markets surveyed, Asia comes out top in online travel bookings, mobile searches and mobile bookings.

Asian travellers’ top two travel-related activities on mobile are:

  • Searching for travel accommodation 59%, an increase of 13% compared to the global average. Thailand respondents were the highest at 65% amongst the countries in Asia.
  • Comparing prices of travel accommodation 50%, 10% more than the global average.

One third of Asian travellers booked travel accommodation via their mobile devices, an increase of 8% on the global average. But, 63% of Asian travellers are likely to book their accommodation on mobile, compared to the global average of 53%.

Although 83% of respondents own a mobile phone with internet access, 40% of respondents say it is difficult to read content via mobile. These respondents claim this as a top issue while 35% respondents report a slow/unstable mobile internet connection also as a challenge.

Below is the infographic:

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via Asian travellers lead in mobile travel search and bookings [INFOGRAPHIC].

flydubai looks to boost trade and tourism links with India | Travel Daily ME

Ghaith Al Ghaith, CEO, flydubai

Ghaith Al Ghaith, CEO, flydubai

India will soon witness increased focus on growing trade and tourism links from UAE. The recent flydubai inaugural flight highlighted this trend with its new connections to Delhi, Kochi and Thiruvananthapuram.

There has been consistent and positive growth of Foreign Tourist Arrivals FTA from the Middle East to India over the last three years. This has primarily been as investment, tourism and trade ties continue to strengthen between the two regions.

Sudhir Sreedharan, senior vice president – commercial GCC, Subcontinent and Africa for flydubai said: “Tourism, investment and trade between India and UAE are important economic drivers. Since we started flying to India in 2010 there has been strong demand for our flights.”

His Excellency Mohamed Sultan Abdalla Al Owais together with business leaders attended a dinner in Delhi to mark the commencement of flights. Business Class will be available on all three new routes in India too.

via flydubai looks to boost trade and tourism links with India | Travel Daily ME.

Why Uber and Airbnb Are the Only Truly Disruptive Travel Companies of This Century – Skift

For years travel industry insiders have bemoaned the fact that big, successful brands haven’t emerged since companies such as Expedia, TripAdvisor, and to a lesser extent, Kayak, made their marks at least a decade ago.

In the interim in Europe, brands such as Booking.com, Skyscanner, and Trivago have

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airbnb (Photo credit: Gustavo da Cunha Pimenta)

arrived on the scene, and in China Qunar and Ctrip are becoming household names.

The emergence of Uber and Airbnb, with valuations that dwarf those of major car rental companies and hotel chains, truly takes things to a new level as the two have the potential to be global brands despite the regulatory issues they must overcome.

Uber and Airbnb seemingly came out of nowhere, and they and their competitors are transformative in the way they are changing widely held notions of the hired car business and lodging.

Uber just landed an additional $1.2 billion in funding at a $17 billion valuation and its mobile app, along with that of its competitor Lyft, is driving incremental demand and helping to change what consumers have come to expect in car-rental services.

Airbnb, too, which has a whopping valuation north of $10 billion, is helping to redefine lodging, and as Hyatt CEO Mark Hoplamazian states, although Airbnb will inevitably evolve, it is here to stay.

How Different Should Startups Be?

Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb have the potential to be big global brands because they are truly different than the companies in their respective sectors that preceded them.

Some would say they are “remarkably different” than their predecessors.

That phrase comes to mind because I was recently talking with Sam Shank, the CEO of HotelTonight and an avid travel startup investor, about the pitches he gets from travel startups.

Shank told me that when startups talk to him about their differentiation, he essentially asks them if what they are building is “remarkably different.”

A travel startup such as Hipmunk, for example, created its Agony Index for flight and hotel search, but it can be debated whether that was a unique enough foundation to lead to later success. Hipmunk hasn’t stopped there, of course, but you get the idea.

To be truly successful, a travel startup should strive to be remarkably different from the pack — like Uber and Airbnb and their competitors arguably are.

Trip Advisor

Hopper’s Pivot

Which brings us to travel startup Hopper, and what might be called the travel startup brain drain.

Founded by Frederic LeLonde in 2007, Hopper set out to build a huge destination database and to transform the trip-planning process.

With $22 million in funding, Hopper waited for about a half dozen years before it debuted an “alpha” site, showcasing its long-awaited trip-planning product.

It didn’t impress.

Now comes word that Hopper has pivoted because after seven years in the making, Hopper discovered that travelers weren’t particularly interested in its destination content and trip-planning offering.

In its latest iteration, Hopper has travelers accessing “reports” about airfares on potential flights to discover the best time to fly.

It’s as though the Hopper team has been operating in a bubble, divorced from marketplace realities and after having fallen in love with the technology it built, it now has come up with another product that travelers won’t be interested in to justify all the labor that it did over the years.

No one has been able to make a business out of predictions on when to fly, and even Bing Travel, which inherited flight-prediction technology with its acquisition of Farecast several years ago, recently killed its flight-prediction feature.

By all accounts LeLonde is a very intelligent technologist, and he’s had previous success, having founded Newtrade Technologies and selling it to Expedia in 2002.

But, Hopper wasn’t – and apparently isn’t – creating anything that is remarkably different, whether it is in trip-planning, fare predictions, or a rumored metasearch product.

LeLonde, and in fact a whole slew of well-intentioned travel startup folks, especially those countless founders and co-founders who are laboring away at trip-planning startups and trip-planning apps in various forms, are essentially spinning their wheels and wasting investors’ money, too.

via Why Uber and Airbnb Are the Only Truly Disruptive Travel Companies of This Century – Skift.

2014: Is this the tipping point for online travel distribution in APAC? | Travel Industry News & Conferences – EyeforTravel

Jun 2, 2014

As the travel industry starts to mature and new disruptive forces enter the fray, are you – and your business partners – ready to pivot?

skyscanner_logoIn a world where many travel brands want to drive more direct business, how do you choose the right partners? Whether it’s Google, Expedia, Skyscanner or Groupon, one pressing question is this: how are they going to assist or hinder your efforts in the fight to win the next billion Asian customers? By 2030, tourists from Asia will lead all regions of the world in total departures and travel expenditures. So yes, it’s a booming market and there are huge opportunities – as well as some significant challenges.

Over the past month, we’ve been talking to some of the speakers who presented at EyeforTravel’s Travel Distribution Asia last week. They helped us to identify some emerging trends in the region. Let’s now take a closer look.

1. Ready to pivot? Are peer-to-peer and villa rentals the next big thing?  Is this a tipping point in online travel?

Sean Seah, MD of Groupon Travel thinks so. “I think we’re at a pivot point. What I call travel 1.0 – the OTAs, search engines and pretty much metasearch too, which has been around for ages, have matured,” he says.

In APAC, specifically, this is a whole new segment, which could seriously shake up and disrupt the distribution model.“

In 2014 and 2015, the whole peer-to-peer model, like Airbnb and vacation rental space, like HomeAway, will be huge and that is going to make it even harder for travel suppliers like hotels to play the game, as these other guys are going to be just as good,” says Seah.

In Asia, there are still huge opportunities to run villas – especially for groups and families – in, say, Phuket and Bali

“The OTAs have brought transparency to the hotel space, but there is absolutely no transparency in the market for villas,” explains Seah.In other words, they are hard to find, very few are doing it and nobody has – as yet – gained critical mass. While, things are changing though this represents one of the greatest opportunities in APAC.

2. Mobile: it’s massive and it’s mainstream

For Skyscanner’s Andy Sleigh, General Manager, APAC you simply can’t succeed in APAC unless you understand mobile and are prepared to take advantage of mobile growth in a region, where around a third of the 4-billion strong population have access to the mobile internet.

“We take a mobile first approach – it’s a no-brainer when your mobile traffic more than tripled as ours did last year,” he says.

Expedia could not agree more.expedia-logo

Says Traci Mercer, Vice President, Market Management – Asia Pacific at Expedia Lodging Partner Services: “Mobile is massive, mainstream and the marketplace for travel is – Now!”

With mobile as the mainstream medium, Mercer says Expedia will be considering what the next ‘well’ is for new customer acquisitions. Watch this space.

3. Where next for wearables…and the smart TV?

For Mercer the big question is: “As we play this forward [the fact that mobile is now mainstream], what do wearables and smart TVs do to commerce online?”

In APAC, Mercer points toa leapfrogging of the PC in favour of smartphones and tablets or ‘phablets’ and this, along with the emergence of low cost carriers, is creating a larger middle class and creating an abundance of new travel consumers. Of course, when it comes to wearables, we aren’t just talking Google Glass, and there is plenty of room for innovation on this front.

4. Keep it clean, simple and transparent 

What KAYAK has seen through continued growth in 2013 is that there are similar user preferences across its various regions, and if we are speaking of integrity, it’s important to be transparent too.

“Consumers across all regions prefer a simple, intuitive and clean user interface, comprehensive search results, a fast response time, transparency in pricing, and a seamless multi-platform experience,” says Debby Soo Vice President – APAC.

KAYAK believes it is able to take its widespread and deep experience with consumer preferences in the US and apply those lessons to markets like Europe and Asia.

via 2014: Is this the tipping point for online travel distribution in APAC? | Travel Industry News & Conferences – EyeforTravel.

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